Win At All Costs: Paul Sait
Name: Paul Joseph Sait D.O.B: 4 September 1947
Birthplace: Sydney, NSW Nickname: Saity
Position: Lock, Centre, Five-Eighth, Second Row, Prop Club Debut: Round 4 1968 vs. Western Suburbs, Lidcombe Oval
Club Games: 165 Club Points: 90 (30 tries)

One of the most ferocious players to have ever worn the Red and Green, Paul Sait became a fan favourite among the Rabbitohs' faithful as a versatile competitor from 1968-1978.

A South Sydney Junior with the Matraville Tigers, Sait made his first-grade debut in 1968 against Western Suburbs, and proved his utility worth early on, taking on multiple roles in the side as his preferred position of lock was occupied by Ron Coote.

But positional setbacks and injuries early on failed to deter him, as the underdog continued to challenge for a first-grade spot in the legendary teams of the late 1960s, and was a reserve in the loss against Balmain in the 1969 Grand Final.

The following two seasons Sait played a major role in the Clubs' 19th and 20th Premiership victories, terrorising opponents in the centres and putting in a particularly strong performance in the 1970 decider with his fierce running and reckless defence.

His strong performances for the Rabbitohs were rewarded as he became a member of the 1970 World Cup winning Kangaroos squad, and the next season made his Test debut against New Zealand.

In 1972 Sait was again a part of the Australian World Cup squad, putting in one of his finest performances against France where he scored a double in the 31-9 win.

Representative honours continued for the talented utility as he played for City Firsts and New South Wales, as well as playing nine Tests for Australia, including all three matches against Great Britain in 1973.

But it was in the Cardinal and Myrtle where Sait shone brightest, taking up the lock position vacated by Coote in 1972, and captaining the side on occasion while leading the next generation of Rabbitohs as the heroes of the 60s and 70s departed and retired.

One of Sait's most prolific traits was his win-at-all-costs attitude, which spearheaded teammates through the attrition of the Rugby League field, and it was on display when hulking teammate Charlie Frith put a sickening hit on Bill Cloughessy in a match against Western Suburbs late in his career.

With his opponent out cold on the floor, Frith nervously asked Sait "What if I've killed him?"

To which Sait nonchalantly replied, "Well, better kill another".

The man who held his preferred lock position, Ron Coote, had plenty of praise for his former teammate.

"He was a brilliant player," said Coote unashamedly.

"He had to wait his time to make his mark in first grade but when he did he a terrific job when he played in the centres, in the forwards or wherever you needed him to play.

"Sait was a great attacking player and could defend too."

After spending his entire career at Redfern, Sait was inducted as a Life Member of the Club in 1991 and was named at centre in the South Sydney Dream Team and the Souths Juniors Team of the Century.

If you need to find an example of persistence and fight, look no further than Paul Sait.

Career Milestones

Premierships: 1970, 1971 
World Cup: 1970, 1972 
South Sydney Captain 
South Sydney Football Club Life Membership (1991) 
South Sydney Dream Team (2004)
South Sydney Juniors Team of the Century (2008)

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