Students from the Souths Cares School to Work Transition Program* spent last Thursday at the University of Sydney filming a series of short health promotion messages that will be used to educate and inform Aboriginal communities across regional and remote Australia.

The students from two southern Sydney high schools have been working with students from the Graduate Diploma in Indigenous Health Promotion course to design, animate, film and produce the clips.

Brock Schaefer, General Manager of Souths Cares, said that the Framing Health Project allows for the graduate students to reacquaint themselves with contemporary adolescent issues.

“The high school students bring with them a knowledge of current issues, pop culture and language which contributes greatly to the way the messaging is structured and delivered to the community,” said Brock.

“Our high school students from J. J. Cahill Memorial and Tempe High Schools, learn a lot, too.

“Studying at university is not just about stuffy lecture halls and the writing of endless essays. University life can be fun and learning takes place in a variety of forms.”

Messages that the students are working on are focussed on body image and how it impacts on self-esteem.

“Sadly these issues seem more widespread today and can effect males and females from all walks of life,” said Brock.

“Body image is a major factor in self-esteem, which influences the way we think and feel about ourselves as a person.

“The currency of these issues makes the work our students will produce over the coming weeks even more important to the community.”

Souths Cares hopes that the messages conveyed in the clips will challenge old beliefs and encourage more young people to enjoy healthier and active lifestyles.

“We hope to communicate messages that encourage our youth to try new things, give them the power to believe in themselves and the confidence to make healthy choices now and throughout their lives.

The Project will conclude this November with an informal ceremony showcasing the students’ important work.

*The School to Work Transition Program is supported by the Australian Government.