Souths Cares have kicked off their 2015 road show by visiting Glen Innes Public School and Minimbah Primary School as part of their week-long journey through New England to promote the importance of good oral hygiene while also hosting a number of NRL Rugby League clinics.

Students of both schools were taught Souths Cares’ ‘Clean well, drink well’ message from Rabbitohs legends such as Rhys Wesser and Nathan Merritt before getting a free dental check-up courtesy of the program.  

“This has been a wonderful start to what is going to be a very productive week,” said Brock.

“Souths Cares has such a strong link to our local community, but we want to take those positive messages even further. That’s what this trip is about.

“We, along with the NSW Centre for Oral Health Strategy, Colgate and the Poche Centre for Indigenous Health, make up a strong team that is intent on raising awareness about good oral health and hygiene among young, Indigenous students.”

State-wide Manager of Aboriginal Oral Health, Boe Rambaldini, says that the program will serve to deliver positive outcomes in those communities visited.

“Untreated dental decay rates are often more than twice as high among Aboriginal- Australians compared with non-Aboriginal Australians,” said Boe.

“That is why the Centre has ensured clinical staff from the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services, Poche Centre for Indigenous Health and the Mid North Coast Local Health District will undertake free assessment checks for all students participating in the Program.

“The staff will also be making referrals, if necessary.”

Director of the Poche Centre for Indigenous Health, Kylie Gwynne, is proud that the organisation is playing a role in the program.  

“The Poche Centre is delighted to support this important initiative,” said Kylie.

“When role models such as Rabbitohs players promote oral health, kids are more likely to brush their teeth, drink tap water and wear a mouth guard.”

“Improving the oral health of Aboriginal children is fundamental to reducing chronic disease and closing the gap in life expectancy”